The RPM Act of 2021 has been introduced in an effort to permanently make race cars exempt from EPA regulation via the Clean Air Act. (Hein Brothers Photo)
The RPM Act of 2021 has been introduced in an effort to permanently make race cars exempt from EPA regulation via the Clean Air Act. (Hein Brothers Photo)

McHenry & Ruiz Introduce RPM Act Of 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressmen Patrick McHenry (R, NC) and Raul Ruiz (D, CA) have introduced the Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports Act of 2021, or RPM Act, which would permanently block attempts by the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate modified motor vehicles used for racing.

For decades, automotive enthusiasts have modified street vehicles into race cars run in various divisions at race tracks throughout the country. In early 2016, the EPA issued a proposed law that would make it illegal for this practice to continue via the Clean Air Act even though Congress never intended for race cars to be subject to the Clean Air Act.

While the proposed EPA regulation was withdrawn in April 2016, the RPM Act would permanently make race cars exempt from EPA regulation via the Clean Air Act.

“Here in North Carolina, we enjoy a rich automotive heritage that not only plays an important role in our local economy but is an activity enjoyed throughout the state,” said Congressman McHenry. “Representing a district with deep ties to motorsports, I am proud to support automobile racing and will work to ensure enthusiasts of the sport here in North Carolina and across the country can continue the time-honored tradition of modifying stock vehicles for competitive racing. I look forward to working with my colleagues to help ensure the RPM Act becomes law.”

The bipartisan bill includes 48 original sponsors. The RPM Act protects Americans’ right to convert street vehicles into dedicated race cars and the motorsports-parts industry’s ability to sell products that enable racers to compete.

“SEMA looks forward to working with Congress to enact the RPM Act and make permanent the Clean Air Act’s original intention that race vehicle conversions are legal,” said SEMA President & CEO Chris Kersting. “We thank Representatives McHenry and Ruiz for standing up for racing and the motorsports parts industry by introducing a bipartisan bill to protect racing and the businesses that produce, install, and sell the parts that enable racers to compete.”

There has already been an outpouring of support for the RPM Act this year, with Americans sending more than 1.1 million letters asking Congress to pass the legislation.

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